MANGALDAS MARKET

You have got to be kidding me! I just accidentally deleted a post… I’m punching my hands on our very hard wooden table, moping, making angry and sad noises, throwing angry glances at my laptop screen, checking my phone and iPad, googling possible solutions. No nothing is going to bring it back so I’ll just have to write it better the second time over!

So Mangaldas market! Quite the adventure to go there on your lonesome self. “Hi mam”, “Eek minute mam”, “Mam, what you need?”, “Mam please look”, mam, mam, mam. You feel about 20 years older after a good 5 minutes and start to develop a slight headache. It actually becomes fun when you start to imagine everyone saying these words on a Bollywood tune with the appropriate amount of dancing involved. But this market is not about the vendors, it’s about what they sell.

As lonely planet puts it “Mangaldas Market, traditionally home to traders from Gujarat, is a great place to browse for Indian textiles and traditional clothes, such as duppatas (the long scarfs atop the salwar kameez .)” This description is pretty useless for everyone who has never set foot in India so I’ll try and provide you with some Indian culture!

Gujarat is one of the famous Indian dry states. (Read where they are NEVER EVER alowed to drink alcohol, but end up drinking a lot!) It is located right above Maharastra, of which Mumbai is the capital, following the Indian coastline. 

A duppata is a long scarf that is essential to a traditional Indian outfit and according to lonely planet and wikipedia it is often worn with the salwar kameez. This intimidating notion is a combination of a dress with a pair of trousers/leggings. I hope this is true and that none of my Indian friends will come and lecture me on traditional Indian wear afterwards. They might even tempt me to try on one of these gorgeous outfits that scare and intrigue me at the same time.

So I arrived at Mangaldas Market on a Thursday morning. I already know my way around the area so I walked right into this labyrinth that is called a fabric market. I can always walk in and out but can never orient myself once I’ve entered so by walking around for an hour or two I make sure I see everything once, or twice, or thrice?

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(one of the entrances, the market itself is located inside)

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(where a lot of the stalls have some sort of religious decoration)

I sincerely apologize for the fact that I haven’t taken any pictures from the hallways, the people, the constructions etc. My phone decided to almost die on me when I was halfway into the market and I had obviously forgotten my camera at home. The market is a labyrinth of hallways filled with tiny little stalls that sell cielinghigh stacked fabrics in all colors, textures and compositions. It is a covered market so proper light is scarce.

I did however take a lot of pictures from the different fabrics available at the market. You can categorize most of them into shirting and suiting fabrics, silk variations, typical Indian dyed cottons and an insane amount of embroidered fabrics.

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(shirts anyone?)

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(some embroidered cottons and linens)

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(stacking abilities are a very much appreciated skill at the market)

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(you guessed it, some duppatas!)

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(some printed cottons, also called Indian ikat)

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(purely embroidered fabrics)

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(jacquard fabric with golden and silver threads)

A lot of these fabrics are just a little too much for me but a few really caught my eye! They are sligthly more subtle and some have just the right structure to create a nice jacket

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(do you remember the cross stitch ladies?)

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(a simple but perfect silk)

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(golden embroidered, perfect for an evening jacket I would think)

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(and last but not least some jute blends with a nice shine to them!)